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The designer’s thirst-quencher served weekly

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Hot Shots

Meet some creative people
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Cooking Comically

What began with a pot of chili, a food photography assignment and a Reddit post soon took on a life of its own for Tyler Capps, the graphic artist and self-taught cook behind Cooking Comically. "I come up with the recipes, cook them, photograph them, draw on them, eat them and share them," he says. "Not necessarily in that order." His web-based collection of illustrated recipes such as Trustfall Chicken, Mash-Tatoes and Bolognese for Days is now available in book form with the publication of Cooking Comically: Recipes So Easy You'll Actually Make Them (Perigee). Break out the spatula and pass the Sexy Pancakes. Notes Capps: "If you aren't having fun when you cook, you're doing it wrong."

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House Blend

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Bucky for Birds

Bring a touch of modern design into your backyard with the Geo-Birdhouse. This miniature ceramic version of Buckminster Fuller's favorite shape -- the perpetually futuristic geodesic dome -- was designed by Kelly Lamb to be used as a nesting place for wrens, finches and other small birds, but would look just as attractive indoors as a dangling conversation piece. We particularly like how it captures the general conclusion about Bucky’s utopian structure: It's for the birds.

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House Blend

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The Line

Trends once held sway for seasons, even years. Now they're stale within weeks—or however long it takes for them to trickle down to your Aunt Marge's Pinterest board. A new e-commerce site offers a refreshing solution through its focus on "quintessential things": enduring stuff that you won't grow tired of after a few uses. Launched this week, The Line is stocked with a tightly edited assortment of clothing, furniture, homegoods, beauty products, and books from established and emerging brands including Reed Krakoff, Mason Pearson, KPM Berlin, and elegant newbie fashion label Protagonist. Where else can you find Phaidon's Alexey Brodovitch monograph, the perfect t-shirt, and a toothbrush made of magical Japanese charcoal?

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Font Fizz

Typography
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I Love Eurostile

"Everything a graphic designer can do, I can do better... with Eurostile," pronounces the industrial design grad turned "big time movie producer" (personified by Edgar Allan Poe in Ray-Bans) behind I Love Eurostile. The cheeky typographic tribute is in fact the work of Mike Mai, a Boston-based web designer who knows the power of squarish letters with rounded corners. Scroll through to discover Aldo Novarese's 1962 typeface in all of its vaguely space-age charm, including Mai's "restiled" logos and videos that feature Eurostile in action. Come on—you know you love it.

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Magic Potion

Cool ideas & design solutions
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Connor

Old-school analog beauty makes the leap to the digital realm in a new iPad app from Connor. Named for renowned 19th-century stationer John Connors, the New York-based company has brought its distinctive engravings (all done by hand in Paris), vintage steel dyes, classic typefaces and exotic graphics to the tablet. Users can tap, type and send birthday greetings, save the dates, love notes or just a hand-engraved tweet. Start with a quick thank you note to Connor co-founder and creative director Henri Richter-Werner for making the app free to download.

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Book Brew

New and upcoming books
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Marks of Excellence

The prodigal bible of trademarks has returned. We didn't think it was possible to improve upon the authoritative taxonomy of trademarks, but the newly revised and expanded edition of Per Mollerup's 1999 best-seller, Marks of Excellence (Phaidon), includes 500 new images as well as 80 pages of additional material. From the rules of heraldry to lessons of highly effective logos, this is the ultimate identity design reference, whether you're looking for inspiration, ready to delve into the shifty signs and signifiers of semiotics or just eager to explore the origins of iconic marks.

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House Blend

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Pencil Socks

As a chill creeps into the newly autumnal air, we often begin each day by asking, "What would Joseph Dixon wear?" The printer, photographer and inventor introduced the first graphite pencil in 1829 and is the namesake of the Dixon Ticonderoga Company, which today cranks out nearly a half a billion pencils a year. And so we imagine he would approve of the latest addition to our fall wardrobe: No. 2 pencil socks, new from Fred Flare. Their toasty synthetic blend is sure to keep you warm, from eraser-rimmed calves down to freshly sharpened toes.

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Font Fizz

Typography
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Talking Type

You say Noi-ya Hel-veh-tih-kuh, we say Noi-ya Hel-vay-tee-kah. Before we call the whole thing off, let's brush up our typographical pronunciation skills with this handy primer from Ralf Herrmann. The German designer and author recently took to his blog, Opentype.info, in an attempt to settle age-old questions such as: do you pronounce Frutiger’s typeface Univers like the English word “universe”? Nope. Listen and learn the proper pronunciation of some popular European typefaces, from Akzidenz-Grotesk to Zapfino.

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Book Brew

New and upcoming books
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Kern and Burn

"I discovered the real opportunity for designers is to not only shape the world and decide its path, but to provide ways for others to do the same," writes Keenan Cummings in the introduction to Kern and Burn, a new book by Tim Hoover and Jessica Karle Heltzel. Itself the product of a successful Kickstarter campaign, the volume is full of advice, stories, and perspectives from Peter Buchanan-Smith, Jessica Hische, Kate Bingaman-Burt, and 27 others designers who have founded startups, channeled personal passions into self-made careers, and taken risks to do what they love. Adds Cummings, "This book is an ode to creators and builders, those who have found their vision and pursued it with force."

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House Blend

Interesting products
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Seriously?

Show bemusement and downright disbelief in the way that nature intended: with a sticky note. These colorful ones from Knock Knock, the Venice, California-based company that prides itself on "putting the fun in functional," frame your message with a single word: "SERIOUSLY?" The idea for the snappy squares ($3.99 per pad of 100) came from Rebecca Osmolski, who bested the competition to win Knock Knock's sticky note contest. No, seriously, she did.

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